Bizarre

Soviet psychedelia: The Legends of the Peruvian Indians (1979)

This incredible animation film is based on the legends of the ancient Peruvians, recreated from drawings. The drawings also inspired the psychoactive visuals of the animation, which along with an Aztec lute on the soundtrack, liken it to a psychedelic experience.

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Soviet psychedelia: The Legends of the Peruvian Indians (1979)

This incredible animation film is based on the legends of the ancient Peruvians, recreated from drawings. The drawings also inspired the psychoactive visuals of the animation, which along with an Aztec lute on the soundtrack, liken it to a psychedelic experience.

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Top 10 Soviet Sci-fi films about Space Travel

On this date in 1961 Yuri Gagarin became the first man to travel into space, and today I want to take you on a journey through landmark, culturally significant and just curious examples of Soviet sci-fi cinema (or if to use a more indigenous term – fantastika) dealing with space travel.

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Top 10 Soviet Sci-fi films about Space Travel

On this date in 1961 Yuri Gagarin became the first man to travel into space, and today I want to take you on a journey through landmark, culturally significant and just curious examples of Soviet sci-fi cinema (or if to use a more indigenous term – fantastika) dealing with space travel.

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Hell as seen by Estonians: Põrgu (1983)

Põrgu (Hell) is an Estonian animation film by Rein Raamat, Tallinnfilm, 1983. So grotesque and sexual, this animation brings to life three infernally beautiful engravings –  ”The Preacher“, “Cabaret” and “Hell” – created by the Estonian artist Eduard Viiralt in the early 1930s.

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Hell as seen by Estonians: Põrgu (1983)

Põrgu (Hell) is an Estonian animation film by Rein Raamat, Tallinnfilm, 1983. So grotesque and sexual, this animation brings to life three infernally beautiful engravings –  ”The Preacher“, “Cabaret” and “Hell” – created by the Estonian artist Eduard Viiralt in the early 1930s.

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MMM studio presents: Gongofer (1992)

Gongofer (Гонгофер, 1992) is the most cryptic film in the history of post-Soviet cinema, the meaning of which we won’t even try to decipher. As the opening title states, the film is a story of “a cossack Kol’ka Smagin – a tall, handsome man with brown eyes. Until he was 25, his eyes were brown, then

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MMM studio presents: Gongofer (1992)

Gongofer (Гонгофер, 1992) is the most cryptic film in the history of post-Soviet cinema, the meaning of which we won’t even try to decipher. As the opening title states, the film is a story of “a cossack Kol’ka Smagin – a tall, handsome man with brown eyes. Until he was 25, his eyes were brown, then

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R2-D2 Soviet edition, 1967

Don’t you think that this robot from a 1967 Soviet sci-fi film Andromeda Nebula (Туманность Андромеды) looks like an earlier model of R2-D2? I like to believe that John Stears and Tony Dyson stole the blueprints and have been enjoying benefits from merchandise ever since. To put the historical record straight watch Andromeda Nebula (with English subtitles)

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R2-D2 Soviet edition, 1967

Don’t you think that this robot from a 1967 Soviet sci-fi film Andromeda Nebula (Туманность Андромеды) looks like an earlier model of R2-D2? I like to believe that John Stears and Tony Dyson stole the blueprints and have been enjoying benefits from merchandise ever since. To put the historical record straight watch Andromeda Nebula (with English subtitles)

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Soviet Terminator: Yablochko (1946)

Thanks to the technique of “optic reposition” (the process similar to cutout animation, but using live action material) the piano player and the sailor are making a real spectacle. A bit of dancing, a bit of acrobatics, a bit of dismemberment. The technique was devised by Nikitchenko brothers in 1946, and Georges Méliès would be green with

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Soviet Terminator: Yablochko (1946)

Thanks to the technique of “optic reposition” (the process similar to cutout animation, but using live action material) the piano player and the sailor are making a real spectacle. A bit of dancing, a bit of acrobatics, a bit of dismemberment. The technique was devised by Nikitchenko brothers in 1946, and Georges Méliès would be green with

/ No comments

Dziga Vertov’s Soviet Toys: The first (and possibly the weirdest) Soviet animation

A belly of a gluttonous bourgeois is cut open by a  centaur formed by a worker and a farmer. A Mystery Man (creepier than the one from Lynch’s Lost Highway) appears from time to time and advertises something. The film ends happily (?): Red Army soldiers appear and form a Christmas tree, that is decorated with

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Dziga Vertov’s Soviet Toys: The first (and possibly the weirdest) Soviet animation

A belly of a gluttonous bourgeois is cut open by a  centaur formed by a worker and a farmer. A Mystery Man (creepier than the one from Lynch’s Lost Highway) appears from time to time and advertises something. The film ends happily (?): Red Army soldiers appear and form a Christmas tree, that is decorated with

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The things you didn’t know about Star Wars

No Star Wars film was officially screened in the Soviet Union until 1988. Certain people always had access to forbidden fruits of the West, but back in 1977 common folk had to content themselves with this short news piece published under the heading “Mass Culture -77″ (with the sub-heading “Cosmic Cine-Horrors”) in the box titled “Their

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The things you didn’t know about Star Wars

No Star Wars film was officially screened in the Soviet Union until 1988. Certain people always had access to forbidden fruits of the West, but back in 1977 common folk had to content themselves with this short news piece published under the heading “Mass Culture -77″ (with the sub-heading “Cosmic Cine-Horrors”) in the box titled “Their

/ One Comment

Metropolis á la Marxism-Leninism: Loss of Sensation (The Robot of Jim Ripl) (1935)

On this date in 1927, the great Metropolis was premiered in Germany.  Therefore today we want to talk about a 1935 Soviet film Loss of Sensation, alternately titled as The Robot of Jim Ripl (Гибель сенсации, или Робот Джима Рипль), which is a close counterpart of Metropolis within Soviet cinema – almost equally as great,  but nearly

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Metropolis á la Marxism-Leninism: Loss of Sensation (The Robot of Jim Ripl) (1935)

On this date in 1927, the great Metropolis was premiered in Germany.  Therefore today we want to talk about a 1935 Soviet film Loss of Sensation, alternately titled as The Robot of Jim Ripl (Гибель сенсации, или Робот Джима Рипль), which is a close counterpart of Metropolis within Soviet cinema – almost equally as great,  but nearly

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My Grandmother (1929): experimental Georgian phantasmagoria

It is absolutely extraordinary that an hour-long film from Georgia, My Grandmother (ჩემი ბებია, Kote Mikaberidze, 1929), predating the surrealism of Dalí and Buñuel, Breton’s dark humour, Artaud’s Theatre of Cruelty, and even hypnotic homoerotism of Cocteau’s Blood of a Poet (1932), manifests the elements of all these ensuing cultural phenomena. So if you are

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My Grandmother (1929): experimental Georgian phantasmagoria

It is absolutely extraordinary that an hour-long film from Georgia, My Grandmother (ჩემი ბებია, Kote Mikaberidze, 1929), predating the surrealism of Dalí and Buñuel, Breton’s dark humour, Artaud’s Theatre of Cruelty, and even hypnotic homoerotism of Cocteau’s Blood of a Poet (1932), manifests the elements of all these ensuing cultural phenomena. So if you are

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Amphibian Man (1962): Cousteau, Disney and a lovable gill-man from the USSR

When Hollywood was sweating its guts out to lure Americans away from TV screens with all sorts of cinematic spectacle, Soviets set out to “catch up and outdo”. Thus Amphibian Man (Человек-амфибия, 1962), directed by Vladimir Chebotaryov and Gennadi Kazansky, became the first fiction film in the history of the world cinema mostly shot under water. 

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Amphibian Man (1962): Cousteau, Disney and a lovable gill-man from the USSR

When Hollywood was sweating its guts out to lure Americans away from TV screens with all sorts of cinematic spectacle, Soviets set out to “catch up and outdo”. Thus Amphibian Man (Человек-амфибия, 1962), directed by Vladimir Chebotaryov and Gennadi Kazansky, became the first fiction film in the history of the world cinema mostly shot under water. 

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Sexy Latvian creature feature: The Spider (1991)

It’s Halloween and we thought we’d mark the occasion with a post about one-of-a-kind erotic horror film from Latvia – The Spider (Zirneklis, directed by Vasili Mass, 1992) The film was released the next year after Latvia restored its independence from the Soviet Union, which places it in the historically curious context of the Soviet

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Sexy Latvian creature feature: The Spider (1991)

It’s Halloween and we thought we’d mark the occasion with a post about one-of-a-kind erotic horror film from Latvia – The Spider (Zirneklis, directed by Vasili Mass, 1992) The film was released the next year after Latvia restored its independence from the Soviet Union, which places it in the historically curious context of the Soviet

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A Nail to your Brain: schizoid art trash Nails (2003)

Tetsuo: The Iron Man was often described as a collaboration of Lynch and Cronenberg on an early draft of Terminator, which was to be shot in Japan. If so, then the Russian budget-less underground film Nails (Гвозди, 2003) is a project of Lynch’s and Cronenberg’s bastard children, who due to the shortage of cash, had

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A Nail to your Brain: schizoid art trash Nails (2003)

Tetsuo: The Iron Man was often described as a collaboration of Lynch and Cronenberg on an early draft of Terminator, which was to be shot in Japan. If so, then the Russian budget-less underground film Nails (Гвозди, 2003) is a project of Lynch’s and Cronenberg’s bastard children, who due to the shortage of cash, had

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Viy (1967): There was no sex horror in the USSR

Horror in the Soviet Union shared the same fate with sex; and if sex was nevertheless trying to beat its way to the cinema screens guerrilla style, no tradition of horror cinema established during the Soviet times. However, Soviets did leave a mark in the history of horror genre, and did it unawares – by assigning an adaptation of a classic

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Viy (1967): There was no sex horror in the USSR

Horror in the Soviet Union shared the same fate with sex; and if sex was nevertheless trying to beat its way to the cinema screens guerrilla style, no tradition of horror cinema established during the Soviet times. However, Soviets did leave a mark in the history of horror genre, and did it unawares – by assigning an adaptation of a classic

/ 5 Comments
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